Disney DVD's:
Classic Cartoon Characters


Walt Disney created some of the most popular characters of all time. Here are some of the DVDs available through Amazon.com or their partners. This is not yet a complete list, but I'm adding DVDs to the list daily. If you wish to purchase any of these items, click on either the title or the cover to be directed to Amazon.com. As a warning, I have put up pictures to give you somewhat an idea of the style of each movie so the pages may load slowly, depending on the speed of your internet connection.

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Walt Disney Treasures - The Complete Goofy (1944)
With a gentle, childlike innocence, Goofy has delighted audiences for 70 years. For the first time ever, celebrate Walt Disney's lumbering, lovable, and eternally loyal everyman in this retrospective of his classic animated shorts and enjoy the heyday of one of the most popular characters in cartoon history. Unlike the rest of Disney's "mouse pack," Goofy didn't become a major movie star overnight. This compilation of shorts begins with the Goof's first starring role. The volume also includes animator Art Babbitt's original descriptive reference of all things Goofy, the original voice behind the Goof, Pinto Colvig, and an exclusive interview with the current voice of Goofy, Bill Farmer. You'll also have the opportunity to see theatrical posters and other memorabilia, a selection of story drawings, and background paintings. After all, it's the Goofy thing to do. Featuring exclusive introductions by film historian Leonard Maltin, this is a timeless collection from generations past for generations to come.

Product Description

In Stand By Me (1986), one of the boys asks, "If Mickey is a mouse and Donald is a duck, what's Goofy?" The answer: he's a dog. Originally named Dippy Dawg, the Goof, as the animators called him, made his debut as an obnoxious hayseed in "Mickey's Revue" (1932). This generous collection includes 46 of the 48 shorts that starred Goofy between 1939 and 1961 (but none of the great Mickey-Donald-Goofy films from the mid-'30s). The "How to Ride a Horse" sequence in The Reluctant Dragon (1941) set the pattern for many of these cartoons. An elegant narrator (artist John Ployardt) explains a sport that Goofy attempts to demonstrate. The character that animator Art Babbitt described in a 1935 lecture (quoted in the DVD bonus material) as an easygoing dimbulb gave way to an enthusiastic but spectacularly maladroit figure. One of the funniest entries in the series, "Hockey Homicide," contains several studio in-jokes: dueling stars Icebox Bertino and Fearless Ferguson, and referee Clean-Game Kinney are named for artists Al Bertino, Norm Ferguson, and director Jack Kinney.

During the '50s, Goofy was transformed into a genial suburban Everyman in such domestic sitcoms as "Fathers Are People," "Two Weeks Vacation," and "Father's Day Off." The animators reduced his floppy ears and buck teeth, improved his posture, and gave him a brisker walk. The best-known short from this period is "Motor Mania" (1950), a mildly didactic spoof of American behavior on the road that was shown in driver's education classes for decades.

Decription from Amazon.com

Walt Disney Treasures - Mickey Mouse in Living Color (1937)
During the mid-'30s, Mickey Mouse's fans ranged from the more than one million children who were members of the Mickey Mouse Club to Franklin Roosevelt, Mary Pickford, and the Nizam of Hyderabad; theater marquees announced "A Mickey Mouse Cartoon" with the feature titles. These wonderful shorts, many of which have never been released to the home market, remind viewers just how charming Mickey was before his popularity and role as a corporate symbol restricted his behavior. In these cartoons Mickey's personality was boyish, appealing, and slightly mischievous. The superb animation emphasizes that impish appeal. When Mickey dances with a deck of cards in "Thru the Mirror," he displays a stylish grace Fred Astaire might envy; in "Brave Little Tailor," his expressions and body language reveal his thoughts as he outwits Willie the Giant. It's virtually impossible to watch him without smiling. These shorts overflow with color and motion, and their lavish visuals pack an increased impact in an era of minimal television animation. Only Walt Disney would spend the money to animate a full deck of cards, a band flying through the air in a tornado, or a clutch of semitransparent ghosts, and only his animators could make those characters live on the screen. The prints have been lovingly restored without pumping up the color too much: the nuances of the delicate watercolor backgrounds still come through. Parents, Disney buffs, and animation fans will want this superb collection in their home libraries.

Description from Amazon.com

A collection of twenty-six animated shorts in color starring everyone's favorite, Mickey Mouse, released between 1935 and 1938. Introduction by Leonard Maltin. Cartoons: The Band Concert, Mickey's Garden, Mickey's Fire Brigade, Pluto's Judgement Day, On Ice, Mickey's Polo Team, Orphan's Picnic, Mickey's Grand Opera, Thru the Mirror, Mickey's Rival, Moving Day, Alpine Climbers, Mickey's Circus, Mickey's Elephant, The Worm Turns, Magician Mickey, Moose Hunters, Mickey's Amateurs, Hawaiian Holiday, Clock Cleaners, Lonesome Ghosts, Boat Builders, Mickey's Trailer, The Whalers, Mickey's Parrot, Brave Little Tailor.

Product Description




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